Dental Assisting Career Training – Get Started With Free Information

If you’re considering a new career and you enjoy helping people smile, why not check out dental assisting? There are few other occupations where you can make a bigger difference in a person’s life. A new healthy smile can help transform a withdrawn wallflower to a shining star, and dental assistants are part of the magic.Dental assistants work under the direction of professional dentists, and perform a wide variety of office, patient care, and laboratory tasks. They are not the same as dental hygienists, who are specially licensed to perform a range of clinical tasks.Let’s look at some of the typical responsibilities of dental assistants.• Office: Greet patients, answer phones, receive payments, schedule and confirm appointments, maintain patient treatment records, send bills, and order dental office supplies.• Patient care: Dental assistants may be asked to prepare patients for treatment, hand instruments and materials to the dentist, take dental X-rays, process X-ray film, prepare materials to make impressions and restorations, and apply topical anesthetics to gums or cavity-preventive materials to teeth.

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• Laboratory: Make temporary crowns, create casts of the teeth and gums from impressions, and clean and polish removable appliances.Job prospects are excellent! According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the employment of dental assistants is expected to grow much faster than average for all occupations from 2008 to 2018. Through the current decade until 2018, dental assistants are expected to be among the fastest growing occupations That’s very good news!Sounds good… but how about qualifications? Many states require dental assistants to be licensed or registered, and to complete regular continuing education courses to maintain registration. Additional certification may be needed for radiology (to take patient X-rays). Check the laws in your state. Certification is the official recognition of a dental assistant’s qualifications and professional competence, and may be an advantage when you’re looking for employment.While it’s possible to get on-the-job training to become a dental assistant, you will improve your prospects with experience and/or institutional training. The Commission on Dental Accreditation within the American Dental Association (ADA) has approved many quality dental assisting programs. These programs are offered by career colleges and technical training schools in your community. Most certificate or diploma programs take one year or less to complete. Associate degree programs generally take two years.Curriculums often include classroom, laboratory, and clinical instruction in both practical skills and theory. Programs may offer “externships,” which are part-time unpaid jobs in dentist’s offices, schools, or clinics, where students can gain practical experience. Getting real-world experience while attending school can be a valuable learning experience, and it looks good on a resume, too.

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Here’s how to get started. Taking the first step is easier than you may think. You can get free education information by logging onto a reputable college directory website. Simply enter the search terms that are appropriate for you, such as “dental assisting degree Florida” or “online dental assisting certificate.” You’ll be presented with the career schools that meet your criteria. In minutes you can compare programs, financial aid options, and flexible schedules. Then just click on the schools you like in order to get more free information directly from the schools. It only takes a few minutes to get your training started!